Feedlot performance of dromedary camel (Camelusdromedarius) calves fed different dietary regimes

Author

By Intisar Yousif Turki, Rabab Mohamed Ahmed, Hamid Agab, Mohamed Tageddin..

Abstracts

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feeding performance of Sudanese dromedary camel calves kept under controlled management systems and fed three different dietary regimes. It was also aimed to compare the body weight obtained by using direct weighing bridge and the body weight obtained by using certain body dimensions. The study was carried out at the Animal Research Unit, College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production, Khartoum North (Kuku). Twelve growing dromedary male camels were used in the 70 days study trial. The average initial body weight of the calves was 175.75 0.25 kg. The calves were randomly divided into 3 groups, of 4 animals each. The calves in each group were randomly allotted into a separate iso-caloric and iso-nitrogenous dietary treatment. The fattening performance of experimental camels was significantly (P<0.05) affected by dietary treatments. Dry matter (DM) intake, average daily weight gain and feed conversion ratio were significantly (P<0.05) different among dietary treatments. Kenana feed (complete fattening pellets) tended to be superior for daily weight gain (0.815kg), daily DM intake (4.35kg ) and final live body weight (233.28kg). Camels fed diet of cottonseed cake (CSC) had lowes (P<0.05) feed intake (3.99kg) and daily gain (0.591kg) with poor feed conversion ratio (9.98). Prediction of body weight from body measurements has been proved in this study. The results showed that there was a high correlation (p<0.0001) between body weight obtained by direct weighing using a weigh bridge and the body weight obtained using certain body measurements.

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